Scarlet Robin

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Mickp
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Posts: 2809
Joined: 09 Nov 2008, 19:03
Location: Yenda NSW
Location: Yenda NSW

Latin Name:
Petroica multicolor

Other Names:

Basic Breeding Info:
Average Clutch Size: 1 to 4 eggs
Incubation Period: 16 day
Leave nest: 17 days

Diet:
Predominantly Insectivorus

Approximate cost per pair:

South Australia:

Victoria:

Queensland:

New South Wales:

Western Australia:

Tasmania:


Cock
Image

Hen
Image
Mick.
Finch addict and rodent hater.
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Ian Hamilton
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Posts: 123
Joined: 28 Jan 2017, 12:28
Location: Central Coast, NSW

In terms of 'Diet' can we get a sense from members what else you feed. What your regime ----

* cake ( what sort ?),
* veges ( how prepared ) ,
* insects - what type , how they are sort/collected, roughly much per bird ( a handful/cupful ) ?

* no doubt plants can play a part attracting insects - are there any species that are a 'must have' attracting moths, butterflies, crickets, grubs etc ?


I'm asking this for 'Robins generally'. I'll be posting the same on the other species & your help is very greatly appreciated.

Robins eat may well be the same as Wrens for example. I'm sure there are crossovers for Honey-eaters & Chats too. Fruit doves & other species may pick at the same thing.

I am endeavouring to extract members techniques to enable us all to broaden our avicultural enjoyment.

Thanks !
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starman
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Posts: 590
Joined: 04 Oct 2016, 18:51
Location: Coastal N.S.W.

Hi Ian,

These are a beautiful little bird. Although we live in their habitat range, I can not recall ever seeing one in the wild....even while four-wheeling through the hinterland forests. I have never seen one in captivity either, which is a bit puzzling as they would be great little birds for a well planted aviary. Being in decline, licensable, fully insectivorous and apparently not that easy to cater for, may put them in the 'Too Hard' basket for many hobbyists.
Apparently, there are management programs in place to study their needs and to research the reasons for their decline. One thing that I gleaned from reading, is that the Willy Wagtail will drive them out of its territory and that is probably one reason that I don't see them around here, also, they tend to avoid suburbia for more naturally wooded terrain. I have a cousin on the Coast, who is an amateur naturalist, and lives on a large wooded property...if they are still around these parts , he will know.

This in no way answers any of your questions, but you piqued my curiosity for this lovely little bird.


Update to post 22/11/2017:
I asked my elderly cousin about the likelihood of this little robin existing in our area....he said that he can not remember ever having seen one.
His property is, however, heavily populated with Blue Wrens.
Sm.
Avid student of Estrildids in aviculture.
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Pete Sara
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Posts: 2221
Joined: 09 Nov 2008, 19:44
Location: Byford WA
Location: eastern suburbs of perth w.a

HI Ian , I don't get on here much as of late . those pics of the robins were actually mine. Not that they can be seen as its an old photo bucket account .
In terms of diet , pretty much the same as wrens , plenty of live food as in mealies, maggots and crickets . They did take soft food on the occasion with that being insectivore mix and a bit of madera cake .

The Hardest part was getting them to hold colour enough to even look like scarlets , I was trying injecting a mealie with canary colour enhancer , but unfortunately I lost the cock bird out of the blue a while back . I couldn't find a replacement for the hen so she passed away from old age recently. But finding any these days is hard enough as it is .. Pete
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Ian Hamilton
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Posts: 123
Joined: 28 Jan 2017, 12:28
Location: Central Coast, NSW

Thanks for coming back to me Pete,

Rgds.
Ian
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