Split pied?

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deegs
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29 Mar 2015, 10:34

Hello to all,
I have been breeding a pied cock to a normal hen this season and some of the babies are normal, will they be split for pied? Thanks for your help, Deegs.
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Craig52
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29 Mar 2015, 13:13

Hi,yes they are.It's a mutation where you get a lot of pied,very little or no pied where it is hidden but these birds bred to a heavy pied can produce some very nice pied birds and two heavy pied birds can produce birds with no pied but have yellow bills.It's a hit and miss pied but dominant. Craig
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Tiaris
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29 Mar 2015, 14:20

No, dominant mutation = no splits.
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Craig52
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29 Mar 2015, 16:58

Craig52 wrote:Hi,yes they are.It's a mutation where you get a lot of pied,very little or no pied where it is hidden but these birds bred to a heavy pied can produce some very nice pied birds and two heavy pied birds can produce birds with no pied but have yellow bills.It's a hit and miss pied but dominant. Craig
Tiaris wrote:No, dominant mutation = no splits.
Ooops,you are right Tiaris,"it's a mutation where you get a lot of pied,very little pied or no pied at all where it is hidden" so no pied at all is not a split it's a non visual pied. Cheers Craig :thumbup:
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Blue Cuban
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29 Mar 2015, 21:28

Craig52 wrote:
Craig52 wrote:Hi,yes they are.It's a mutation where you get a lot of pied,very little or no pied where it is hidden but these birds bred to a heavy pied can produce some very nice pied birds and two heavy pied birds can produce birds with no pied but have yellow bills.It's a hit and miss pied but dominant. Craig
Tiaris wrote:No, dominant mutation = no splits.
Ooops,you are right Tiaris,"it's a mutation where you get a lot of pied,very little pied or no pied at all where it is hidden" so no pied at all is not a split it's a non visual pied. Cheers Craig :thumbup:
Hehe .... Yes I very much argee with your corrected statement. I don't refer to non visual Pieds as being splits,if a parent was pied all offspring is pied no matter what they look like.

I'm looking forward to a few Pieds I bred last year that look like normals to breed this year, if only that seagreen gene would appear as well.... :D

Rich.
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Craig52
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01 Apr 2015, 09:37

Hi Rich,hopefully you have a strain that has NO seagreen floating around in your pied birds.So please don't mix them,if you like them that much set up a colony on their own.Personally,i don't like seagreen pieds with their wishy washy cream pied compared to the bright yellow on a green bird but every one to themselves. :thumbup: Craig
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finchbreeder
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01 Apr 2015, 11:08

It's a funny thing. I grew up with a mother who breeds budgies. So my intro to birds was with a strong emphasis on genetics and mutations. And my favourite budgies are pieds and the bright coulours. BUT I find that i frequently don't like pied finches. Think it is because the pieding is generally not neat and uniform, but messy and splotchy. So my favourite parrot finches are normal original types.
LML
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deegs
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01 Apr 2015, 14:46

Hi to all and thanks for the feedback. I'm still a little confused though. Will the normal looking babies, with black beaks, but with a heavy pied father, produce pied babies if paired to a normal bird next season? Cheers again for the help, Deegs.
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Craig52
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01 Apr 2015, 17:21

deegs wrote:Hi to all and thanks for the feedback. I'm still a little confused though. Will the normal looking babies, with black beaks, but with a heavy pied father, produce pied babies if paired to a normal bird next season? Cheers again for the help, Deegs.
Yes and no,as i said it's a hit and miss mutation.If you want to continue breeding good pieds,a heavy pied to a light seems to be the way to go. Craig
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garymc
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01 Apr 2015, 17:56

Interesting I always thought that these occured in single and double factor.

A double factor bird throws all pieds (single or double factor dependending on its mate) where a single factor when paired with the right/or wrong partner throws a proportion of both pieds and normals. I think Firetail 555 may be able to add to this.

I also recall an old Australian Birdkeeper article written by the founders of pied redfaces in Australia and they mentioned that any hatchling (upon hatching) that had a black tip to its beak comes out as a normal and bred true to normal. I have noticed that some young birds hatch with yellow tips but by the time they have fledged they have darkened to that of a normal so these would still be pied.

If a bird is pied then there is no logic/reason as to how heavily variegated the bird will be. Ray explained it to me that a pied bird (thats one that did not have a black tipped beak upon hatching) is like a artists easel. If the bird is pied then the artist get to throw paint at it - some get lots, somes get litte and some totally missed (i.e the amount of variegation is random). The black tipped ones however have no paint thrown at them at all.

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