Austerity diet

Advanced questions and discussion on specific bird species.
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Craig52
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Location: victoria

David, do you keep the above mentioned birds, Lesser Red brows, Pictorella's, Strawberries, WE masks, crimson and masked finches as well as Green singers and others that are set to breed in our Winter climate if not you will lose their breeding season cutting out live food any other protein foods plus all their regular seeds.
Weavers are a completely different scenario coming into breeding season where the weather and day light hours play a big part in whether they are going to breed or not as well as their nuptial plumage wont happen if conditions are not right.
I am sorry but i am going to disagree with you to agree as well because this austerity diet is like playing Russian roulette with a lot of our finches.
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arthur
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My advice . .

If the dog might bite . . Don't pat it . . :silent:
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Ian Hamilton
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Location: Central Coast, NSW

arthur wrote: 07 Jul 2018, 21:10 My advice . .

If the dog might bite . . Don't pat it . . :silent:
Revolving doors don't slam & Steam Rollers do't roll steam..... I don't understand what you'r getting at Arthur :wtf:

( suffice to say I'm clueless with your cryptic birds game :shifty:
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Ian Hamilton
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Location: Central Coast, NSW

Tiaris wrote: 07 Jul 2018, 11:46 Have you lost those birds since putting the austerity diet in place?
Winter is the natural breeding season for Pictorellas, Strawbs & Lesser Redbrows.
Short answer is Yes.

The Pic's had a couple of nests with clear eggs & I didn't want to lose her over winter with egg binding.

Similarly with the Strawbs - many nests (6 since last Oct) all infertile

The cock Lesser.. I believe the deterioration in diet meant less body fat meaning more susceptible to the cold ( despite artificial heating provided). He had only been introduced to a new young hen, so I wasn't expecting breeding results immediately.

I'm thinking i'm going to have to catch out & hold for a while give the hens a break.
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arthur
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..... I don't understand what you'r getting at Arthur :wtf: [/quote wrote:
Simply extending Craig's "Russian Roulette" metaphor . . that's all
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finchbreeder
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Location: Midwest of West. Aust. Coast
Location: Midwest of West.Aust.Coast

Appropriate treatment of finches is very much governed by what we keep and where we keep them. The coldest and hottest 6 weeks of the year where I live are - in my oppinion, but not necessarily in the birds - silly as can be times to be breeding. So they get a little less attention then, or if I can stand the weather a major clean and spruce up to get them out of the idea for a little while and therefore keener when the weather improves. Breeding in 2 x 4 1/2 month periods would suit me and I feel, be better for them. And if they decline to do so thats OK.
LML
LML
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Storz
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Joined: 26 Aug 2014, 20:32
Location: Hamilton Vic

I have been following this post with interest and have some thoughts on it. At the moment unusually it is wet and cold early this year, but the birds in the wild , ie. Ravens, plovers, honeyeaters and chats are all nesting many with young. Not much tucker about for these birds at this time of the year but they still manage to successfully breed. I wonder if these manage to survive under these conditions why cage birds need to be regulated as to when they can and cannot breed. Why change their diet and breeding areas when their natural instinct is to breed when conditions are suitable for them. If I don't want a particular pair to breed I just seperate them and leave the diet and nesting facilities the same. Just my thoughts, works well for me
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deegs
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Location: Adelaide SA

Well, some interesting conversation. I'm lucky to have a few aviaries and always stop my spring/summer breeding finches from breeding through the winter, it's easy, I seperate the cocks from the hens over winter and put them back together in early August. By the time they have paired up and made their nests etc the weather has warmed up and babies hatching in mid Sept, perfect. As for diet, I keep up a good mix of seed, greens etc all year round but introduce live food in August. Good luck to you all for the coming season.
Deegs.
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