Saving a Rainbow Lorikeet

Post Reply
User avatar
Lachlan1
...............................
...............................
Posts: 231
Joined: 03 Aug 2014, 21:06
Location: Castle Hill NSW

07 Sep 2014, 18:43

Hi Team,

Today when I was driving home from work I noticed a flightless rainbow lorikeet on the side of the road. I got out and noticed fairly quickly It wasnt going to be able to fly up a tree to roost in for the night. I caught it in my jacket and took it to the vet and left thinking I had done my good deed for the day (little did I know). I just got called by the vet and they can't determine what is wrong with it so they said that I can either take it or the best thing they can probably do is euthanise it. I'm about to drive to pick it up now and was just wandering If there are any Rainbow Lorikeet breeders that would be interested in this little guy? I dont keep parrots and never intended to but I'm not going to let a native die for no reason when I could easily save it. If nobody can take it any tips on keeping them would be greatly appreciated.
User avatar
Canary
...............................
...............................
Posts: 474
Joined: 24 Aug 2011, 20:04
Location: Sydney West, NSW

07 Sep 2014, 20:36

We got our Rainbow Lorikeet when he came knocking on our front door.

My son heard a noise at the front on the security door. He thought it was someone knocking, so he went to the front door and when he opened it there was the Lorikeet hanging from the security door. It was about 40C that day. He caught it and brought it inside and put it in an old cage with some water and a piece of apple. I thought it wasn't going to last the night, as it was sitting on the floor looking exhausted.

We have now had it for about 3 years. It has learnt to wolf whistle whenever someone walks past. It got out once and flew away. When we came home it was sitting on top of the cage waiting to get back in. My wife has named it Karl and it will sit on her hand without flying away.

We feed it the Lorikeet powder and water. He takes a beak full of the powder, dips it into the water and eats it that way. We also give him a piece of apple and orange each day. My wife gives it a range of fruits including pears, bananas, kiwi fruit, mandarins. He loves any moist fruit and also green leaf veges such as spinach or kale.

We often have other lorikeets come and sit on the cage.
Image
User avatar
Shane Gowland
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Posts: 1064
Joined: 19 May 2014, 22:42
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

08 Sep 2014, 11:03

Did the vet test it for beak and feather disease? Lorikeets tend to be unusually prone to it and can be a cause of flying issues.
User avatar
Craig52
...............................
...............................
Posts: 4500
Joined: 11 Nov 2011, 19:26
Location: victoria

08 Sep 2014, 17:25

ShaneGowland wrote:Did the vet test it for beak and feather disease? Lorikeets tend to be unusually prone to it and can be a cause of flying issues.
I agree, most vets just put them down now just in case they have BFD. Craig
User avatar
Lachlan1
...............................
...............................
Posts: 231
Joined: 03 Aug 2014, 21:06
Location: Castle Hill NSW

08 Sep 2014, 18:23

After having a closer look at the bird I have a feeling it may have jumped the nest a little early. It is very tame for a "wild" bird. No they didnt test for that disease. It is extremely active, and comes across as just young. Hopefully I can help it through the next month until it can fly and then I can release it at my local reserve.
User avatar
arthur
...............................
...............................
Posts: 1859
Joined: 13 Mar 2009, 10:22

08 Sep 2014, 21:14

If it has a black beak it is young

If it does not there may be other 8-) reasons that it cannot fly

And being young doesn't preclude it from PBFD
User avatar
Shane Gowland
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Posts: 1064
Joined: 19 May 2014, 22:42
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

08 Sep 2014, 21:34

From the Australian Wildlife Rehabilitation conference:
Rainbow Lorikeets and Scaley Breasted Lorikeets are by far the most common wild birds in South East Queensland that are presented with PBFD. These birds are typically young (still have dark beaks) and present with their tail feathers and outside primary wing feathers missing and are often called ‘runners’ because of their inability to fly. Remaining flight feathers will often pluck out very easily and have the classical calamus abnormalities of PBFD (ie pinching/necrosis ).
User avatar
iaos
...............................
...............................
Posts: 1169
Joined: 18 Aug 2009, 20:07
Location: Newcastle, NSW
Location: Newcastle, NSW

08 Sep 2014, 21:40

I picked up a runner as a kid. Kept it in a horribly small cocky cage for a couple of months. I didn't think it could fly.

One day it got past my arm while I was feeding it. Last I saw of it it was going strong 100 m down the street.

Good luck with it.
BluJay

25 Oct 2014, 08:18

Awe, very nice story. How is the lorikeet now? Regards

Post Reply

Return to “Parrots”