How many pairs of Aberdeen's to an Aviary

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noah.till
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17 Oct 2019, 09:19

arthur wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 20:29
Initially I thought that Orix's 3 to 5 pairs was a bit high . .

But I remember breeding Aberdeens in the early '70's in a similarly sized, typical beginner's, Noah's Ark Aviary = One pair of everything . . (and no pun intended) . . which certainly held more than 5 pair of birds, though only one pair were Abs

Aberdeens are no harder to breed than Cutties . . but the problem with the young from my pair was that they had deformed beaks . . an obvious sign of consanguinity

So if they were too inbred in the '70's . . :silent:

Perhaps they may be a bit more vigorous these days for whatever reason . . and this is not intended to besmirch genuine breeders of these rareties

If I had a lazy $600, I would put it on something in the Melbourne Cup, rather than invest in Aberdeens




PS . . Many of my posts seem to be negative, these days . . probably getting old and grumpy

But I would not want to see keen youngsters being driven from our wonderful hobby by negative experiences, without all of the arguments being available for their consideration

After that it is their decision . .
Thanks Arthur, and No, you do not sound negative at all
I understand what I am getting into, and I am aware of negative experiences, but I certainly am not that easy to get driven away from birdkeeping
My Avicultural goals is to work with most of the 'little brown jobs' (like Aberdeens and Javan Munias), that really are in the position they are in because of us, and the ongoing limit of genetic material, so I understand there is a fair bit of %@$* that at some point will come across the line
The bloke that I am purchasing from sent 46 birds, all pairs, over to WA a couple years ago, but I will see soon what state his birds are in
Thanks
Noah Till
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project
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noah.till
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17 Oct 2019, 09:21

arthur wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 07:15
What FB said . .

And probably for that same reason, fewer would have been imported in the first place, thus creating an ominous, shallower gene pool

In the early 70's Aus Avic Socy price-list had Aberdeens @ $20 & Cutthroats @ $10 . . Sydney dealers agreed at about $28/ $14 . . a reflection of their availability

The price disparity has greatly widened since then . .

And thereby hangs a tale . .





PS . . Overseas bird dealers 'talk up' the Aberdeen, by giving it the soubriquet of "Paradise Sparrow" :silent:
Cutthroats are on the rise again, I'm seeing pairs being sold for $150 with ease, but I doubt it will last long :?
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project
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noah.till
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17 Oct 2019, 09:26

Craig52 wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 20:30
Noah, i agree with your last post. Start with one pr and work from there. When i had them many years ago they bred better as one pr on their own or with a more boisterous pr of finches like diamonds that build a nest in brush not in a box like aberdeens do.
Make sure your boxes are very ventilated as they are filthy nest makers in particular when they have young as they don't remove droppings which they can't as it's usually green slim and stinks like hell but don't let that put you off as young emurge surprisingly clean.
Regards Craig.
I will drill a couple small holes in the boxes for extra ventilation
I read in Russel Kingstons latest Book and The Finch Breeders Handbook - The foreigns, that they during the rearing process remove the old nest and replace it with a hand made new one
I am bit suspicious about this idea
Thanks
Noah Till
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project
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finchbreeder
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17 Oct 2019, 10:05

Noah - re the idea of replacing the old nest. Take it as a maybe. If your birds are moderate to clean in habits, leave it. If they are messy as all get, change it.
LML
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noah.till
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17 Oct 2019, 10:06

finchbreeder wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 10:05
Noah - re the idea of replacing the old nest. Take it as a maybe. If your birds are moderate to clean in habits, leave it. If they are messy as all get, change it.
LML
Ok, Thank you FB
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project
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arthur
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17 Oct 2019, 10:51

An overseas p.o.v . . .

Some interesting ideas



http://blogs.thatpetplace.com/thatbirdb ... e-sparrow/
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noah.till
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17 Oct 2019, 11:19

Great Link Arthur
Some good to hear quotes: 'It is also a more reliable breeder than the Cutthroat and, if properly cared for, may live for over a decade.', "Red-Headed Finches may be stimulated to breed at any time of the year if a nest box is provided. Many owners have found that they are sometimes “too willing” to attempt nesting"
Would be different compared to our in Aus
Thanks
Noah Till
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project
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noah.till
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01 Nov 2019, 12:51

What other species could possibly go in with Aberdeen's, because I would like to add 1 pr of something else into their aviary (obviously not Cutthroats and smaller finches)
Thanks
Noah Till
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project
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finchbreeder
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01 Nov 2019, 19:23

Something tough but interesting like one of the Zeb mutations? Or try for pure normal Javas?
LML
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noah.till
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01 Nov 2019, 19:45

finchbreeder wrote:
01 Nov 2019, 19:23
Something tough but interesting like one of the Zeb mutations? Or try for pure normal Javas?
LML
I'm not very fond of those two, I just sold the last of my zebras the other day and I am not a fan of Javas at all
I was thinking of some of the larger exotic finches like Golden SS or weavers or something like that
Maybe even Putillias (not sure on those though with how they would go with Aberdeens)
Any thoughts anyone?
Thanks
Noah Till
Downs Bird Breeders Association and Queensland Finch Society Member
2018 Australian Birdkeepers Magazine Young Birdkeeper
Javan Munia and Black Rumped Double bar Breeding Project

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