Tri-coloured Parrotfinch Yellow with black eyes

An area to discuss new and established colour mutations.
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mecapacte
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Joined: 05 Aug 2010, 06:11

Any picture available ?

Who is currently breeding this mutation ?
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Tiaris
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I don't think many of them have survived long enough for them to become established. Very weak birds not worth establishing I reckon.
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finchbreeder
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Location: Midwest of West.Aust.Coast

Sounds like a heavy pied? As a true Lutino would have red eyes.
LML
LML
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Tiaris
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No, they are autosomal recessive black-eyed yellow, not lutino.
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finchbreeder
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Location: Midwest of West. Aust. Coast
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Black eyed yellow, that makes sence. As I said, I knew they were not Lutino, so was querying if they were pieds.
LML
LML
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TomDeGraaff
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Tiaris wrote:I don't think many of them have survived long enough for them to become established. Very weak birds not worth establishing I reckon.
With all due respect, the same could have been said of blue gouldians, white cockatie;s, blue scarlets and jade/olive peachfaces. Some delicate, others boring!!
Let's hope someone will keep trying :)
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Tiaris
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By that I meant that I don't know of any more than one bird reaching adult plumage out of 12 birds I know have been bred. I bred 4 of them myself & none made it to maturity despite virtually all normal phenotype birds bred at the same time doing so. I stand by my comment that such inherently very weak mutations are not worth establishing no matter how good to some they may appear. Any effort to breed them to establishment point can only weaken the species' captive gene pool as a result of the exercise.
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Craig52
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I really tend to agree with you Tiaris,i had a go with them too and never bred a coloured bird from two splits.I filled up my holding cage with 15 young and eventually gave them all away.
After getting info from you and others who had bred them,they are not worth the effort and i have probably polluted the captive gene pool by giving them away. :thumbdown: Craig
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Cmendi00
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Joined: 20 Oct 2010, 23:52
Location: florida

Hey guys does anyone have a picture of this mutation they would like to share?
Thank You
Carlos
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TomDeGraaff
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Tiaris wrote:By that I meant that I don't know of any more than one bird reaching adult plumage out of 12 birds I know have been bred. I bred 4 of them myself & none made it to maturity despite virtually all normal phenotype birds bred at the same time doing so. I stand by my comment that such inherently very weak mutations are not worth establishing no matter how good to some they may appear. Any effort to breed them to establishment point can only weaken the species' captive gene pool as a result of the exercise.
Yes, I see your point, Tiaris. However, these are personal opinions, of course, but perhaps when they do start to reach adult plumage, that would indicate the strengthening of that blood line.
As for polluting the overall gene pool, I agree that mutant birds should be segregated.
If you are referring to the inherent weakness in this mutation, then I wonder if splits are also bedevilled by this weakness. If so, then I reckon you're right.
Anyway, sounds like this variety has already burnt a few fingers!! :)
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