Tri-coloured Parrotfinch Yellow with black eyes

An area to discuss new and established colour mutations.
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Tiaris
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I don't know that they have burnt any fingers yet as all mutant birds I know of were bred from normal phenotype birds so I doubt anyone has purchased/sold any yellows. I know of 4 other blokes who have bred them most of whom are very experienced finch breeders & I only know of 1 bird achieving adult plumage & it didn't last long beyond that point. Its photo is on the Belgian Parrotfinch website (or used to be at least).
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TomDeGraaff
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Tiaris wrote:I don't know that they have burnt any fingers yet as all mutant birds I know of were bred from normal phenotype birds so I doubt anyone has purchased/sold any yellows. I know of 4 other blokes who have bred them most of whom are very experienced finch breeders & I only know of 1 bird achieving adult plumage & it didn't last long beyond that point. Its photo is on the Belgian Parrotfinch website (or used to be at least).
The early days of mutations always have some risks. I do admire those who take those risks and add to our variety of birds. Some always get burnt but that's the name of the game. I remember a friend who bought white cockatiels in the very early days. They died, no young, quickly the price dropped!! He hasn't kept a mutation since !!

On the issue of "are they worth it". I think I know what you and Craig were saying and I've come around to it. The birds I cited as weak at first and then were developed by committed people, were also supported by a substantial larger captive population. Tri-coloureds are limited and so we should be mindful of allowing too many deleterious genes to be produced in case the limited gene pool is affected. This applies to the dilute mutation as well.

I suppose it's like if a blue mutation suddenly appeared in the green avadavat population and it is weak. Do you try to develop this mutation with the need for some inbreeding, or do you concentrate on using a range of bloodlines to establish the normal bird then hope the blue gene is still in the population as a split. I would opt for the development of the normal bird over everything even though I would find the new colour fascinating.
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Tiaris
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The dilute TCPF appears physically solid (and hence far less likely to weaken the captive gene pool of TCPFs) but the fact that it isn't significantly different to normal phenotype in both sexes makes it likely to struggle for sufficient widespread appeal to ensure a secure future for it. The bright yellow one would obviously have more appeal as a distinct and attractive form but it really is chronically weak. When it shows such consistent weakness from otherwise vigorous stock producing otherwise vigorous normal phenotype young, I seriously doubt that it has a worthwhile future.
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mecapacte
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Any news ?
Any picture ?
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alan
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I have 3 friends that often produce 1 or 2 now and again.... The photo with one young bird was from one of my friends this photo was taken March last year. The other photos were taken 20 minutes ago ,this bird is about 5 months old and is doing surprisingly well ...Cheers Alan
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Cmendi00
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Great Pic Alan, thanks for sharing. Beautiful mutation and best of luck to your friend in getting it established.

Regards, Carlos
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finchbreeder
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As the mutation has obviously stayed in the genepool for so long perhaps only the stronger splits are still producing it? Lets hope so.
LML
LML
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mecapacte
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Would be nice to see picture of adult too

Many thanks
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Tiaris
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The top 2 are the 5 month old adult. They are bred from split parents.
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mecapacte
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Any news concerning this mutation in Australia ?
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