Blue Faced Parrot Finch Attacked - This Means War!!!

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Mortisha
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07 May 2012, 22:28

don't know about every else but I wouldn't over handle a little bird like that trying to clean the wound. Stress is a big killer.
The calcium powder probably help seal the wound.
I'd just let it be and keep it calm, quiet, well fed.
Maybe some preventative antibiotics in the water if worried.

If you can't catch its mate maybe a mirror/ bit of brush and a covered section on the cage so it can hide and not feel so alone and exposed.
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Tintola
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07 May 2012, 22:54

It is amazing how birds can heal. I have had several birds scalped and most of them heal very well. Most grow a lot of the skin and feathers back but a bit skewed. I had a Bulbul years ago that was totally scalped right down to the eyes(bare bone) not only did the skin grow back, so did the feathers forming a perfect crest. You would never know it had happened. Don't give up on it yet. :thumbup:
OH LORD, SAVE ME FROM YOUR FOLLOWERS!Image
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VinceS
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Location: Newcastle

08 May 2012, 08:00

Damn it, she expired overnight. Hard to take pics but that is a 2cm slice in the skin showing through the feathers. Doesn't seem to have cut anything inside just razored the skin apart, but I guess the internal organs couldn't cope with the exposure.

Rightio, what are my revenge options? Let's see what we can come up with by way of a good defense for those remaining, "elimination" has a nice ring to it.......... :twisted:
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Some days are Diamonds some days are Zebs. Sometimes the coccidiosis won't leave me alone. Sometimes a cold wind blows a chill in my Gouldians. But any day with my finches is a day without stones.
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E Orix
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Location: Howlong on NSW/Vic Border 30km from Albury
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08 May 2012, 09:15

Just remember there are laws even protecting what we call PREDITORS so be careful what you put in print members
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VinceS
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08 May 2012, 09:18

I am of course referring to relocation, being elimination from the neighborhood to a different habitat. There are of course perfectly kosha ways to do that.
Some days are Diamonds some days are Zebs. Sometimes the coccidiosis won't leave me alone. Sometimes a cold wind blows a chill in my Gouldians. But any day with my finches is a day without stones.
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E Orix
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08 May 2012, 09:31

My statement wasn't directed at any particular person.
Just pointing out that once (in the unlikelyhood of an over zealous persons comments) something goes
on the net it stays there for friend or foe. :think: :think:
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Tiaris
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08 May 2012, 12:11

As you've already said, double-wiring works effectively on the aviary ceiling so why not try it on the walls. Even if you do "relocate" this predator/aggressor, you can guarantee there'll be more in the future so my suggestion is deal with it via aviary construction/alteration which makes it impossible for any future problem. If you go down the other path you really haven't learnt anything constructive from this loss.
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finchbreeder
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08 May 2012, 12:16

I have found the plastic with wire through it makes a good cover. You put it over the area that you wish to prevent access too. But need to be sure that you don't have it loose enought to form heavy pools on the roof. Also plant branches quite close to the avairy so the pests cant dive straight onto the side of the avairy. My tree hangs down there, but can use tall potplants. Think we all get sick of the pests at times, but as long as we remember the nusiances are only defending their territory in their eyes.
LML
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Netsurfer
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08 May 2012, 12:37

It must have been a Noisy Mynah or a Grey Butcher bird. I see the Noisy Mynah birds attacking my birds very often, I am not worried too much about it and so far haven't had any injuries. In fact I like when they stir them up a little so they learn to fear the more dangerous predators like the Grey Butcher birds. One third of my Aviary is roofed another third is covered with a shade cloth and one third is exposed to the direct sunlight. The only time I am worried is when there's lots of young just out of nest and so far I'm lucky as I've not had any problems yet! I feed Rainbow Lorikeets and the Noisy Mynahs are always there. Grey Butcher birds are amazing birds http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species ... -torquatus" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; they are much more equipped to catch a bird even through the wire, they have a long hook at the end of the beak. I would not kill them (they are just trying to catch a meal) they are not trying to annoy you, but catching them is not too difficult, all you need is a little bit of meat or a dead bird in a cage. You can then relocate the bird.
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VinceS
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08 May 2012, 13:36

Netsurfer wrote:It must have been a... Grey Butcher bird.
You are exactly right, thank you. So now I know for sure. I have an Field Guide to the Birds of Australia and the head markings looked like those on the large honeyeaters. But I didn't spot the grey butchers, being buried in with magpies as they are. A pair of these are definitely the villains that have taken to calling by to see what's on the slab for a morning snack!
Some days are Diamonds some days are Zebs. Sometimes the coccidiosis won't leave me alone. Sometimes a cold wind blows a chill in my Gouldians. But any day with my finches is a day without stones.
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