cut throat finch genetic calculation

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sskmaestro
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Craig52 wrote: 19 May 2023, 12:37 If a true cinnamon it is sexlinked recessive
so that means hens cannot be split to cinnamon?

What will be the mutation of chicks in this pairing?

Yellow ribbon albino male X cinnamon (red ribbon) hen --> normal males with split to yellow ribbon, cinnamon and albino, albino hens split to yellow ribbon?
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Craig52
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Yes and I'm pretty sure yellow ribbon is autosomal recessive so all split
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arthur
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Sadly the chart I posted does not list genetic inheritances . .

The 'ino' is actually a lutino not an albino . . In the case of these birds, they are non-sexlinked lutinos (NSL) so are A-R not S-L-R so there IS such a beast as the split-lutino hen

Mutation Aberdeens come in the same forms as the Cutties . . (probably hybrid mutations . . one way or another) and not surprisingly have the same inheritance patterns . . and mutations of both species are yet to make their debuts in the Land of Oz

And in answer to your question on breeding expectations (which I just saw) . . If you mate a pure A-R mutation with another pure A-R mutation you will get absolutely NORMAL 'looking' birds . . BUT they will be split for both of the parents' mutations [which agrees with Alf's earlier answer, where he speaks of triple splits] . . These are called Double splits and are the starting point for creating a 'combination mutation' . . This simple fact is often lost on even 'mutation people . .
Last edited by arthur on 24 May 2023, 18:53, edited 2 times in total.
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arthur
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arthur
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Assuming Cinnamon is sex linked ['true' Cinnamons are] and knowing White is recessive . . .

Yellow ribbon White male X cinnamon (red ribbon) hen --> Normal-looking (Triple-Split Cocks) + Normal-looking Hens (Split for White and Split for Yellow Ribbon)

But if there are some 'unknown' hidden white genes or yellow genes floating around, some whites and yellows will 'pop up'
Last edited by arthur on 02 Jun 2023, 11:54, edited 1 time in total.
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Alf63
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Thank you Arthur. My research into these birds follows your results.

The only question is whether the "Cinnamon" is a cinnamon or an Isabel which have different inheritance. Breeding results will tell in time.

Unfortunately some mutations are named incorrectly from the outset. Parrot breeders seem to be more versed in mutations than finch breeders
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arthur
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G'day Alf . . Yes parrot breeders have always been a bit more up 'there' than the Finchos . . possibly because of the big money involved in most cases;but certainly because of more consistency in naming
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arthur
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http://sof.rs/edukacija/25.06.2020%20-3 ... NGLESE.pdf

May be of interest to those who have posted, and sure to add to your knowledge..
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finchbreeder
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Having quickly skim read that. It is very comprehensive and there are a lot of interesting mutations out in the world. Some beautiful, some not so. Is it not always the way? Good luck with the breeding to those doing it.
LML
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